Immersive Learning in Action

Depending on their particular age level, children frequently find themselves in certain situations. For example, our preschoolers often drop their bottles and spill water on the floor,  tend to argue over toys as a result of their difficulties sharing, and cry when things don’t go their way. Within the immersive way of teaching and learning, students are basically taught the words and phrases they need and use. As a result of my close observations of what children talk about and in what context, I have put a great emphasis on certain letter sounds and the words starting with them as well as on recognizing and naming feelings.

Among these letters is the letter W and words such as – Wet (floor, clothes, tissue), Wipe (floor, tears), Water, Wait, Wash. Fortunately enough, the kids that I am currently teaching are quite clever and they tend to make immediate connections and apply the words learned to new situations. We learned about the word “wet” in the context of wet hands, wet boy (due to rain), and wet floor, right after playing outside during a hot summer day. Suddenly, one of the students exclaimed “I am wet!” referring to the sweat on her face.

At this age level, children frequently fight over toys and still have a hard time sharing among one another. This results in angry and sad kids. Along with the importance of being emotionally self-conscious, that’s another reason why I stress on recognizing and learning about the feelings we experience before learning how to deal with them. The children I am working with are already familiar with certain emotions – such as angry, sad, happy, scared, tired, sleepy – and the corresponding gestures or expressions. Sometimes kids naturally experience emotions and speak about them while at other times the teacher can elicit these, such as when I prolong the morning yoga exercise until I start having the kids say “I am tired.” or “I am thirsty”.

For the advanced students, I have developed and tested an activity of matching letters to abstract concepts such as feelings.  At first, children match the images of the feelings to the letters. Next, children are demonstrated the feelings and they need to point to the right first letter.

For our new students, I have utilized a great letter match up activity where they need to match the real object to the first letter of its word. Make learning representative of the real world with this fun activity. Be sure to check out Education.com for more learning fun.

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